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> Horror/Killer Movies
BigG
post Apr 10 2011, 09:12 PM
Post #1


Choppin Headz Boi!


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I have

Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974)
Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)
Friday the 13th
Exorcism Of Emily Rose
The Exorcist
The Thing
The Shining
Predator
Alien
Aliens
Audition
Childs Play
Childs Play 2
Silence Of The Lambs
Wrong Turn
It
Audition
Scream
Itchi The Killer
Dawon Of The Dead
Night Of The Living Dead
Jeepers Creepers
Pet Semetary
Pet Semetary 2

Can anyone give me films not mentioned?
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Guest_ViperSniper_*
post Apr 10 2011, 10:24 PM
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I used to be massive on my horror flicks, you've covered alot of the top ones. Maybe elaborate on some of the Nightmare on Elm Streets..also..

Psycho 1 & 2
Halloween 1, 2, 4 & 5
Friday the 13th 2-Manhattan
Poltergeist
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Warlord
post Apr 10 2011, 10:34 PM
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QUOTE (BigG @ Apr 10 2011, 09:12 PM) *
I have

Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974)
Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)
Friday the 13th
Exorcism Of Emily Rose
The Exorcist
The Thing
The Shining
Predator
Alien
Aliens
Audition
Childs Play
Childs Play 2
Wrong Turn
It
Audition
Scream
Itchi The Killer
Dawon Of The Dead
Night Of The Living Dead
Jeepers Creepers
Pet Semetary
Pet Semetary 2

Can anyone give me films not mentioned?

Any of the old Universal films. Dracula, Frankenstein, The Wolfman, The Mummy. Hammer's versions of Dracula (called 'Horror of Dracula' in the U.S.), Frakenstein ('The Curse of Frankenstein' in the U.S.), and The Mummy.

I give the old Universals a slight edge, with Bela Lugosi setting the standard for all future Draculas, and Boris Karloff setting the standard for all future Frankenstein monsters. Bela maybe moreso than Karloff, as Bela not only set the standard for Dracula, but for ALL vampires. Before Bela vampires were grotesque, such as Max Schreck's 'Count Orlak' in Nosferatu. After Bela, vampires were sexy; dark and seductive. Karloff did well portraying the monster as pathos, but this has both been done before and since in many different mediums and contexts. NO ONE ever again captured the seductive darkness that Bela put onscreen.

That said, Hammer's films are by no means second rate, as most of their classics featured all-time great actors in Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee; perhaps unknown to those of you smothered and murdered in modern popular culture. You probably saw these fine actors dozens of times without realizing it. Cushing portrayed Grand Moff Tarkin in Star Wars: A New Hope (he was the one who told Vader to release one of those mugs getting force-choked), while Lee portrayed Count Dooku in episodes 2 and 3 of the same franchise.

For real horror, however, no one does it better than the Japanese. With the exception of the first Saw film, there has been nothing of worth coming out of American cinema for years, as it pertains to the horror genre. Unless you count schlock as good cinema. In that context, they have come out in droves, and Hollywood is king.
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Warlord
post Apr 10 2011, 10:38 PM
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QUOTE (ViperSniper @ Apr 10 2011, 10:24 PM) *
I used to be massive on my horror flicks, you've covered alot of the top ones. Maybe elaborate on some of the Nightmare on Elm Streets..also..

Psycho 1 & 2
Halloween 1, 2, 4 & 5
Friday the 13th 2-Manhattan
Poltergeist

I wouldn't count any of Hitchcock's films as horror, at least in the most specific of terms. Hitchcock films were closer to suspense than horror, in my opinion. But that's just my opinion. I know there are plenty who do classify Hitchcock as a horror director.

To me he is in his own category, separate and distinct from mainstream genre directors. As most great artists are.
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BigG
post Apr 10 2011, 10:40 PM
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Choppin Headz Boi!


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I have all pyscho's and the first 2 halloweens just forgot to mention.

warlord have any recomendations for Japanese Horror/killer films besides Audition and Itchi The Killer?
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Guest_Fitz_*
post Apr 10 2011, 11:18 PM
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I haven't seen it, but this Korean movie is supposed to be good. I Saw the Devil



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Guest_ViperSniper_*
post Apr 11 2011, 12:50 AM
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QUOTE (Warlord @ Apr 11 2011, 04:38 AM) *
I wouldn't count any of Hitchcock's films as horror, at least in the most specific of terms. Hitchcock films were closer to suspense than horror, in my opinion. But that's just my opinion. I know there are plenty who do classify Hitchcock as a horror director.

To me he is in his own category, separate and distinct from mainstream genre directors. As most great artists are.


That's true, Hitchcock films aren't 'horror' & I've always considered Psycho a 'Thriller' rather than anything. Just figured to throw it in there as it may have also cross over to a killer/slasher movie.

Pyscho may not be the scariest or bloodiest but it is my personal favourite out of these genres! Anthony Perkins plays the roll of Norman Bates is classic. The scene where he gets questioned the day after the murder is very impressive acting when he starts stuttering and choking up!!

Started watching a little more Hitchcock movies and the guy makes some very impressive movies and has a great selection of actors. Dial M for Murder is one my new favourite movies, I truly was blown away by that movie!
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Snoop
post Apr 11 2011, 02:06 AM
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Anything by Takashi Miike is generally kinda fucked up.
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Warlord
post Apr 11 2011, 03:40 AM
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QUOTE (BigG @ Apr 10 2011, 11:40 PM) *
I have all pyscho's and the first 2 halloweens just forgot to mention.

warlord have any recomendations for Japanese Horror/killer films besides Audition and Itchi The Killer?

Battle Royale, first and foremost. Not technically a horror film, though I have seen it put into that category. It is without a doubt a film about killing, however. A group of middle school students sent to an island and forced to kill one another until only one remains. A classic, and one of my favorites.

2LDK is another good one. Only 2 characters in the entire film. Girls. Room-mates. Fighting for the same role in a film. Chain saws, swords, toilet lids, ice picks, and bleach are just a few of the weapons they use on each other. A great film with a great twist, as only the Japanese can do.

Suicide Club, more than the other 2, might be the one that is closer to being a true horror film. Another great, great film.

Kuya (English title 'Cure') is another good one, but like all Japanese horror this is an ultra-cerebral film, one that has a deep underlying message to go along with it. If you're into schlock, the 3 I mentioned already should satiate your appetite, even if the point of the films fly over your head. Kuya invariably disappoints those who go into it expecting a typical slasher. It is so densely layered that multiple viewings are needed before you can start to make sense of it. And even then, not everything is explained. That being one of the main differences (generally speaking) between western and Japanese audiences. Most western movie studios pound the plot and subsequent plot point(s) (if there is one) over your head with a mallet. Japanese films, for the most part, do not.

Some older classics would be Ringu and Ju-On, though they have been greatly over-hyped, to the point that they now disappoint due to the massive expectations people take with them.

Kwaidan, though, is pure awesome. It's old, but it's still fucking awesome. If you can't get down with that film, you need to get your head checked for malformation. Kwaidan, based on the book of the same name, is a collection of ancient Japanese ghost stories. Great sets, great costumes, great makeup, great source material. Just fucking great.

That's it for now. Definitely check them out if you're interested in expanding your scope or refining your palate. If modern American horror is the epoch of art in your book, however, you should stay far, far away from these films. They will disappoint.
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Warlord
post Apr 11 2011, 03:44 AM
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QUOTE (Snoop @ Apr 11 2011, 03:06 AM) *
Anything by Takashi Miike is generally kinda fucked up.

I don't get down with Miike's stuff. It's just too brutal for me. Sadists would probably love Miike and worship at his throne. There's a difference between using violence to tell a story, telling a story using violence, and using violence as a story. Miike opts for the 3rd in most cases. It's okay, I guess, and definitely commercial. But it's just not my cup of tea.
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