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> Deontay Wilder and The Right Hand from Hell
MaxPayne
post Aug 17 2013, 12:00 AM
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I want to point out one thing.

The fact that Deontay Wilder won an Olympic Bronze medal is actually somewhat telling. Let's examine how the fights went down:

Defeated Abdelaziz Toulbini (Algeria) 10:4
Defeated Mohamed Arjaoui (Morocco) 10+:10 (tiebreaker criteria)
Lost to Clemente Russo 7:1

He didn't knock anyone out, which means that he won on points obviously. Scoring points in the Olympic / Amateur arena involves a few things, which requires accurate punching.

What we've learned then, is that Deontay Wilder is that 5 years ago, he had enough punching accuracy and timing to beat guys at the Olympic level and to secure a Bronze Medal.

Many times, we look at prospects that are coming up and wrecking people and we look for reasons to criticize them. In many cases, that criticism is warranted and in others, it may not be so accurate.

Take a case like Brandon Rios. This is a guy who for a long time had an undefeated record. Yet his fighting strategy / skill-set was basically, "I'm going to put my head against yours and keep swinging until you fall down".

That whole, come forward / brawling style has clear deficiencies. It's also not the case with Deontay Wilder.

Wilder is landing punches from distance that are both powerful and accurate. We sit here thinking he has only one punch, but landing that right hand takes a precision that you can't ignore.

Mind you, I think Wilder has a long way to go. Yet the idea that he ISN'T the best young American Heavyweight fighter right now is absurd.

Many people point to Andy Ruiz being that guy, but I'm sorry. If you have bitch tits and love handles to the point where you're on the Chris Arreola side of the game, then I'll have to pass unfortunately.

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Cshel86
post Aug 19 2013, 12:42 PM
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QUOTE (MaxPayne @ Aug 17 2013, 01:00 AM) *
I want to point out one thing.

The fact that Deontay Wilder won an Olympic Bronze medal is actually somewhat telling. Let's examine how the fights went down:

Defeated Abdelaziz Toulbini (Algeria) 10:4
Defeated Mohamed Arjaoui (Morocco) 10+:10 (tiebreaker criteria)
Lost to Clemente Russo 7:1

He didn't knock anyone out, which means that he won on points obviously. Scoring points in the Olympic / Amateur arena involves a few things, which requires accurate punching.

What we've learned then, is that Deontay Wilder is that 5 years ago, he had enough punching accuracy and timing to beat guys at the Olympic level and to secure a Bronze Medal.

Many times, we look at prospects that are coming up and wrecking people and we look for reasons to criticize them. In many cases, that criticism is warranted and in others, it may not be so accurate.

Take a case like Brandon Rios. This is a guy who for a long time had an undefeated record. Yet his fighting strategy / skill-set was basically, "I'm going to put my head against yours and keep swinging until you fall down".

That whole, come forward / brawling style has clear deficiencies. It's also not the case with Deontay Wilder.

Wilder is landing punches from distance that are both powerful and accurate. We sit here thinking he has only one punch, but landing that right hand takes a precision that you can't ignore.

Mind you, I think Wilder has a long way to go. Yet the idea that he ISN'T the best young American Heavyweight fighter right now is absurd.

Many people point to Andy Ruiz being that guy, but I'm sorry. If you have bitch tits and love handles to the point where you're on the Chris Arreola side of the game, then I'll have to pass unfortunately.

I never looked at it that way, and truthfully, I tend to forget that he won a medal...though they bring it up damn near every time he steps in the ring. I guess he gets guys outta there so damn quick, that there's not enough time to hear any of his boxing history, lol.

I dont mind his fighting style at all, and why am I even mentioning this? (IMG:style_emoticons/default/no2.gif) Sorry, Im a bit off today. The big gripe is the world saying that he hasn't fought anybody. There ya go Cshel,, get your shit together. Lol

While they're looking for a formidable opponent for him, they need to go ahead and work on that speech of his. It's been a while since we had a decent American HW...no need to have one that goes life and death with his native tongue. Lol
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Franchize
post Aug 19 2013, 02:34 PM
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I think the dude has a ton of potential. I hope he gets the proper technical tutelage and doesn't become a 1 trick, KO artist. He has all the physical tools. He seems to care about defense so far (although he has very little time in the ring). I like his jab and obviously his power. However, I don't like how he reacts to the jab. He tends to take jabs to the chest and lower chin too much and back straight out instead of using angles.
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daprofessor
post Aug 19 2013, 04:19 PM
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he's being trained by mark breland. mark breland is one of the most accomplished amateur boxers the u.s. has ever produced. i think he's in good hands. you make a very valid point max...the thing is...he's not had to go rounds in a very long time. i'm sure he's getting his work in the gym...but i'd like to see how he reacts when someone takes away that big right hand and forces him to use his other tools.
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Franchize
post Aug 21 2013, 07:52 AM
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I saw a clip of him getting some tips from Lennox Lewis in a parking lot on Youtube. I thought it was some good advice. Granted they were in some suits and hard bottoms but, basically, Lennox was showing him how to snap the jab and not load up on it like it's a power punch. He was showing him how to make it effective, quick and shorten the distance/length rather than try to inflict damage with it. I don't think he should hold his hand AS far out because it leaves him open to the hook but I liek the idea.

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daprofessor
post Aug 21 2013, 02:05 PM
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QUOTE (Franchize @ Aug 21 2013, 07:52 AM) *
I saw a clip of him getting some tips from Lennox Lewis in a parking lot on Youtube. I thought it was some good advice. Granted they were in some suits and hard bottoms but, basically, Lennox was showing him how to snap the jab and not load up on it like it's a power punch. He was showing him how to make it effective, quick and shorten the distance/length rather than try to inflict damage with it. I don't think he should hold his hand AS far out because it leaves him open to the hook but I liek the idea.



the big difference between both of their jabs...beside the very obvious starting positions...is that lennox is sitting on his jab and pushing off the back foot... whereas dw is falling forward with his and ending up with all his weight on his front foot making it very easy to be countered or hit.

great find with the video!!!

This post has been edited by daprofessor: Aug 21 2013, 02:06 PM
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