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neophyte7
Born a Slave in Virginia from a family of boxers... it is said that his SLAVE MASTER was so real about training that if he found out Tom was not training hard he would be flogged with Whip..

bOXING WAS popular during slavery times and slave masters would match slave against slave- from plantation to plantation for money


Molineaux Fought hard and after enough wins eventually earned him his freedom. He would be known as the country's first real champion with a reputation for " Talking shit" and calling out fighters. In 1809 he moved to England after hearing how he could earn money professionally while still a slave boxer in the USA

He arrived proclaiming himself to be the World Champion and bragged to London Journalists that he would destroy England Champion Tom Cribb...

London was shocked and marveled that an X slave was bold enough to make such a ruckus. Cribb gave ultimatums on two opponents that Molineaux had to fight to see if he was worthy... both guys were visciuosly Ko'd setting up the match...


Molinueax is said to have beaten Cribb senseless for 20 or so rounds... the racist crowd who could not stand to see Cribb destroyed by the x slave stormed the ring and beat Molineaux resulting in him breaking his finger.

The fight resumed but Molineaux faded and eventually lost by stoppage in the 39th round...

Tom Molinueaux--- a pioneer and rebel 100 years before Jack Johnson was EVEN A THOUGHT
BrutalBodyShots
Interesting.

Any word on what the guy weighed?

_iodine_
here's a couple links

http://www.ibhof.com/cribb.htm

http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/SLAmolineaux.htm

his last name is spelled Molineaux. the title name wont bring you any google results.


yuca
very interesting stuff, thanks a lot...
Was Tom Molineaux America's first champion?
When he reached the shores of England in 1809, it was this title that he claimed. And with it he proceeded to challenge the world. Presumably Molineaux had partaken in his share of matches prior to his rise as a fistic star in Great Britain. But there were and are no records to back his claim, no newspaper accounts detailing his so called championship battles. But it was clear, as it is today, that Tom Molineaux, a former slave from Virginia, was a world class miller, one of great bottom, skill and courage. And one who came within a breadth of winning the Championship of the world.

Maybe history has not been kind to Tom Molineaux. For in reality, he was America's first sports celebrity and a great star in his day. It is true that he never gained any great popularity on this side of the great pond. But what of his international achievements? Think for a moment about the courage and determination it took for a former slave with no formal education, skills or money to speak of, to travel to a foreign land and become one of the most celebrated champions of his time. When taking into consideration the barriers that "The Black" must have encountered, it is a great wonder that Tom Molineaux even made it to scratch against Tom Cribb "The Champion of Champions".

What happened that cold, dreary and rainy day on Copthall Common in the winter of 1810 may have been the most blatant robbery in the history of the prize ring. For on that day, it was Tom Molineaux who should have been crowned Champion. In the 28th round of what had been a titanic struggle, The Moor, as Molineaux was known, knocked the great Cribb to the ground with a telling series of blows. The champion was dragged to his corner by his seconds and worked on feverishly. Both combatants were feeling the affects of their fierce combat, but Cribb was near insensibe. When the referee signalled "time" to call the men to scratch, Molineaux rose from Bill Richmond's knee and toe'd the line. Cribb rose as well, but as he swayed in the air like a weakened tree, his knees buckled and the great champion fell face first to the ground. His seconds rushed to his aid as the referee, for the second turn called "time". Cribb's seconds tried in vain to prop their man at attention but to no avail. Molineaux stood and watched as the rain peppered his face, he himself swaying on unsteady pins. The call of "time" rang out for the third time and Tom Cribb was no closer to scratch than he was at the first call. The referee turned towards Molineaux as Bill Richmond burst from his corner in jubilation of his charge's victory. But before the coronation had begun, Jem Ward sprang from Cribb's corner and grabbed old Bill by the neck. A melee ensued, as Ward accused Richmond of giving Molineaux "bullets". The referee called to Molineaux to open his hands in order for the foul to be disclaimed and the Moor exposed his naked palms. Richmond took after Ward and a hot brawl commenced as men from the warring factions broke the outer ring. Molineaux was caught in the tempest as bodies banged, cursed and entagled. It was a full fifteen minutes before order was restored. Tom Molineaux, who now stood in a solitary corner of the set-to his skin wet, his bones chilled and his teeth chattering, had lost his championship before he had ever won it.

Of course the record books only record that Cribb, who received a steady diet of Brandy and blankets whilst the pademonium created by Ward continued on, went on to outlast the brave Molineaux who in the fortieth round turned to no one in particular and stated through swollen, bloodied lips, "I can fight no more."

Tom Molineaux, America's first champion, had lost. To Cribb yes, but even more so to the weather, the chicanery of Joe Ward and his crew and to the racial climate of his time which simply did not make room for fair play.



Tom Molineaux "The Moor"
Born: Georgetown, South Carolina
Died: August 4, 1818 Galway, Ireland
Height:5’8 ˝"
Weight:185


1810

Jul 24 Jack Burrows W
-This bout lasted 65 minutes
Aug 21 Tom "Tough" Blake W 8
Dec 18 Tom Crib, Copthall Common, England L 40
-This bout lasted 55 minutes. At the conclusion of the 28th round Cribb was badly battered and insensible. When time was called to begin the 29th, he could not, "toe the line". Three times "time" was called and three times only Molineaux came to scratch. As Bill Richmond, who was seconding Molineaux began to celebrate, Joe Ward, a Tom Cribb second stormed across the ring and accused Molineaux of having bullets in his hands(bullets were small tubes of metal or wood held in the hand to make a fighters fists harder and his blows more damaging). A melee ensued and by the time order was restored, Cribb was able to come to scratch. Boxing’s first long count controversy was born and America was robbed of its first champion.

1811

May 21 Rimmer W 21
Sep 28 Tom Crib L 11
This bout lasted 19 min. 10 seconds
? ? Power W
This bout was an impromptu match and lasted 17 minutes.

1812

Jul 27 John Snow L
This was a wrestling match at the Exeter Fair

1813

Mar 31 Jack Carter fight did not take place as Tom was
arrested for debt to Bill Richmond
Apr 23 Jack Carter W 25



1814

May 27 William Fuller NC 8 (police interrupt fight)
May 31 William Fuller , Paisley, Scotland WF 2
This bout lasted 68 minutes.

1815

Mar 10 George Cooper L14
This bout lasted 20 min
-- --- Abraham Deniston Exh.

1818

Aug 4 Dies in Galway, Ireland
HaydelHammer
just out of curiosity and not to get off track here......BUT.

even though boxing is still somewhat primitive by nature...etc but with the overall evolution of the sweet science to today's current development....wouldn't you yourself like to/or thought of getting in the ring with one of those old 1 punch per rd throwing guys and wiping knocking them smooth out in :10 sec flat?

Stuff like this sometimes runs through my dome piece....anyway...nice read very interesting. I think I can take him. lol

Tha Docta
QUOTE(HaydelHammer @ Jul 24 2007, 09:46 AM) [snapback]350761[/snapback]
just out of curiosity and not to get off track here......BUT.

even though boxing is still somewhat primitive by nature...etc but with the overall evolution of the sweet science to today's current development....wouldn't you yourself like to/or thought of getting in the ring with one of those old 1 punch per rd throwing guys and wiping knocking them smooth out in :10 sec flat?

Stuff like this sometimes runs through my dome piece....anyway...nice read very interesting. I think I can take him. lol



ive thought about that before. i imagine using the bob & weave tyson style would have been perfect for these guys. they are standing there looking like they have a stick up their ass while im bobbing and weaving throwing hooks and uppercuts. although, those guys were tough as all hell so they would probably block all of my punches with their face and then i would collapse from exhaustion.
HaydelHammer
QUOTE(Tha Docta @ Jul 24 2007, 10:24 AM) [snapback]350764[/snapback]
ive thought about that before. i imagine using the bob & weave tyson style would have been perfect for these guys. they are standing there looking like they have a stick up their ass while im bobbing and weaving throwing hooks and uppercuts. although, those guys were tough as all hell so they would probably block all of my punches with their face and then i would collapse from exhaustion.


LMAO....nice.

You're right though. If you don't take em out you just kept going rd after rd after rd back then, so landing 100/100 punches on those sand bag footwork mofo's could be tiring.

Good to see I'm not the only one who thinks of this type of sh*t. I'd love to just go back for just one fight and put on a damn clinic.
BigG
QUOTE
they are standing there looking like they have a stick up their ass


LOL laugh.gif
Maxy
I was always led to believe that the first so called pioneer was Bill Richmond. He was definitely the first black man to cross the Atlantic and display in British rings the science he had absorbed whilst working on a plantation.

Richmond was born on August 5 1763 on Staten Island New York. During 1777, whilst New York was held by British troops, Richmond, by beating in quick succession three English soldiers who had set upon him in a bar, attracted the attention of General Earl Percy. Standing 5-6 and weighing between 165 and 170, Richmond was able to defeat several top heavyweights before eventually challenging unsuccessfully for Tom Cribbs title.

He had his last bout at the age of fifty-six in 1818 and amazingly beat the highly regarded Jack Carter. His success in England was the inspiration for Tom Molineaux.
Mean Mister Mustard
That's a damn shame that he did not win the fight even though he was kicking ass. Those fights may have gone 2o and 30 rounds but to our eyes they would not be fun to watch. For starters they featured a lot of clinching and mauling, sometimes more than punching and the reason why was because with no gloves on they had to pick their punches or else break their hand. But these men were though no doubt about it.
neophyte7
The information on Bill Richmond is greatly appreciated...
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