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Warlord
Anton Chigurh: [indicating bag of cashews] How much?
Gas Station Proprietor: Sixty-nine cent.
Anton Chigurh: And the gas?
Gas Station Proprietor: Y'all gettin' any rain up your way?
Anton Chigurh: What way would that be?
Gas Station Proprietor: I seen you was from Dallas.
Anton Chigurh: What business is it of yours where I'm from, friend-o?
Gas Station Proprietor: I didn't mean nothin' by it.
Anton Chigurh: Didn't mean nothin'.
Gas Station Proprietor: I was just passin' the time.
Anton Chigurh: Just passin' the time.
Gas Station Proprietor: Well sir I apologize. If you don't wanna accept that I don't know what else to do for you. Will there be something else?
Anton Chigurh: I don't know. Will there?
Gas Station Proprietor: Is somethin' wrong?
Anton Chigurh: With what?
Gas Station Proprietor: With anything?
Anton Chigurh: Is that what you're asking me? Is there something wrong with anything?
Gas Station Proprietor: Will there be anything else?
Anton Chigurh: You already asked me that.
Gas Station Proprietor: Well... I need to see about closin'.
Anton Chigurh: See about closing.
Gas Station Proprietor: Yessir.
Anton Chigurh: What time do you close?
Gas Station Proprietor: Now. We close now.
Anton Chigurh: Now is not a time. What time do you close?
Gas Station Proprietor: Generally around dark. At dark.
Anton Chigurh: You don't know what you're talking about, do you?
Gas Station Proprietor: Sir?
Anton Chigurh: I said you don't know what you're talking about. What time do you go to bed?
Gas Station Proprietor: Sir?
Anton Chigurh: You're a bit deaf, aren't you? I said what time do you go to bed.
Gas Station Proprietor: Well... I'd say around nine-thirty. Somewhere around nine-thirty.
Anton Chigurh: I could come back then.
Gas Station Proprietor: Why would you be comin back?
Anton Chigurh: You live in that house behind the store?
Gas Station Proprietor: Yes I do.
Anton Chigurh: You've lived here all your life?
Gas Station Proprietor: This was my wife's father's place. Originally.
Anton Chigurh: You married into it.
Gas Station Proprietor: We lived in Temple Texas for many years. Raised a family there. In Temple. We come out here about four years ago.
Anton Chigurh: You married into it.
Gas Station Proprietor: ...If that's the way you wanna put it.
Anton Chigurh: I don't have some way to put it. That's the way it is.

Anton Chigurh finishes the cashews and wads the packet and sets in on the counter where it begins to slowly unkink. The proprietor's eyes have tracked the packet. Chigurh's eyes stay on the proprietor.

Anton Chigurh: What's the most you ever lost on a coin toss.
Gas Station Proprietor: Sir?
Anton Chigurh: The most. You ever lost. On a coin toss.
Gas Station Proprietor: I don't know. I couldn't say.

Chigurh takes a coin from his pocket, flips it, and then puts it on the counter, covering it with his hand.

Anton Chigurh: Call it.
Gas Station Proprietor: Call it?
Anton Chigurh: Yes.
Gas Station Proprietor: For what?
Anton Chigurh: Just call it.
Gas Station Proprietor: Well, we need to know what we're calling it for here.
Anton Chigurh: You need to call it. I can't call it for you. It wouldn't be fair.
Gas Station Proprietor: I didn't put nothin' up.
Anton Chigurh: Yes, you did. You've been putting it up your whole life you just didn't know it. You know what date is on this coin?
Gas Station Proprietor: No.
Anton Chigurh: 1958. It's been traveling twenty-two years to get here. And now it's here. And it's either heads or tails. And you have to say. Call it.
Gas Station Proprietor: Look, I need to know what I stand to win.
Anton Chigurh: Everything.
Gas Station Proprietor: How's that?
Anton Chigurh: You stand to win everything. Call it.
Gas Station Proprietor: Alright. Heads then.

Chigurh removes his hand, revealing the coin.

Anton Chigurh: Well done.

The gas station proprietor nervously takes the quarter with the small pile of change he's apparently won while Chigurh starts out.

Anton Chigurh: Don't put it in your pocket, sir.
Gas Station Proprietor: Excuse me?
Anton Chigurh:Don't put it in your pocket. It's your lucky quarter.
Gas Station Proprietor: Where do you want me to put it?
Anton Chigurh: Anywhere not in your pocket. Where it'll get mixed in with the others and become just a coin. Which it is.

Chigurh leaves; the gas station proprietor stares at the counter with a frightened sigh of relief.

Bill The Butcher
HAHA! I love that scene.

Funny. I just got done watching this movie a few minutes ago.

Great movie.
Warlord
QUOTE(Bill The Butcher @ Mar 15 2008, 12:44 AM) [snapback]382499[/snapback]
HAHA! I love that scene.

Funny. I just got done watching this movie a few minutes ago.

Great movie.

Hell yeah, great fucking movie. Just saw it on excellent quality bootleg DVD.

Chigurh was the shit. Should've gotten 50,000 Oscars for that role.
BrutalBodyShots
I have not seen it yet... I think my favorite dialogue ever was between Dennis Hopper and Christopher Walken in True Romance. That scene owns.

Method
Greart movie.

What was your thought on the ending?

Interpretation?

At first thought, I was pissed the way the movie ended. Completely blindsided/caught me off guard.

Did a bunch of reading/research/discussing w others, and have come to a better understanding of it.

Great movie.

That was a classic scene.
Warlord
QUOTE(Method @ Mar 15 2008, 11:47 PM) [snapback]382643[/snapback]
Greart movie.

What was your thought on the ending?

Interpretation?

At first thought, I was pissed the way the movie ended. Completely blindsided/caught me off guard.

Did a bunch of reading/research/discussing w others, and have come to a better understanding of it.

Great movie.

That was a classic scene.

There was so much underlying shit in that movie that I still haven't figured it all out. But that kind of shit appeals to me, so I was satisfied in a masochistic sort of way that the film ended the way it did. Abruptly, and almost like a slap in the face.

Basically it felt like Tommy Lee Jones's character felt over-powered by the world, as if the kind of man he was no longer had a place in the world, hence the name of the title.

As for Anton Chigurh, I never saw him as a villain at all. The way the film set him up, I think he and Tommy Lee's characters were played as 2 sides of the same coin. The way we caught their muddled reflection in the television, the way they occupied the same couch, both drank the milk, etc...

Chigurh's most telling sentence, I think, was when he compared himself to the coin, saying that what brought the coin was what brought him. Chigurh had a set of moral standards that he lived by, and was completely uncompromising. In a strange sort of way, Josh Brolin's character, Llewelyn, almost came off as the real villain of the film, metaphorically speaking. He was the one with the loosest moral conviction. He took what didn't belong to him, and in the process failed to help those closest to him, or even put them in danger. (The dying mexican, his wife whom he could've saved if only he'd returned the money, her mother, etc...)

To make a long story short, the ending is great for those of us who like to look deeper into such things. And I can also imagine it pissing off a good deal of people who want a more straight-forward ending to their stories.

On a completely unrelated noted, when I first watched the movie I wondered if Chigurh really did kill Llewelyn's wife. But if you look very closely, you can see Chigurh checking his shoes for blood when he walks out of the house. And knowing his strict moral code, I think the answer is pretty clear. Just food for thought.
Bill The Butcher
***SPOILER ALERT***





***SPOILER ALERT***






































Yeah. For sure he killed the wife. He didn't like getting blood on himself, hence the checking of his boots.

There were a few other scenes in the movie that showed that. Where he lifts his legs up on the table or couch to avoid the pool of blood. Or when he kills the two mexicans in the motel room and takes off his socks. Or when he kills the guy in the shower, uses the shower curtain to block the blood. Even when he was choking the guy out in the beginning, he had to turn his head from the blood.

I agree. At first when I saw the movie in the theaters, I walked out of the theater shocked by the ending. But the more and more I thought about it, it fit the movie perfectly. No Country For Old Men.

I like your observation of two sides of the coin with Chigurh and Tommy.
Warlord
QUOTE(Bill The Butcher @ Mar 16 2008, 07:57 PM) [snapback]382883[/snapback]
***SPOILER ALERT***
***SPOILER ALERT***
Yeah. For sure he killed the wife. He didn't like getting blood on himself, hence the checking of his boots.

There were a few other scenes in the movie that showed that. Where he lifts his legs up on the table or couch to avoid the pool of blood. Or when he kills the two mexicans in the motel room and takes off his socks. Or when he kills the guy in the shower, uses the shower curtain to block the blood. Even when he was choking the guy out in the beginning, he had to turn his head from the blood.


Exactly. These scenes, again, kind of reinforce the view that Chigurh is more a force of nature than he is a man. He kills, but the blood is never on his hands, so to speak. Everyone has a chance to save themselves, or the ones they love, at some point. Chigurh, or fate (chance?) is just the end result of your wrong decisions.

It's just a good fucking movie, period. I'd like to hear the Coen's commentary on the symbolism and metaphors littered within the film, because I'm sure there's a ton of shit that none of us has even caught on to yet.
BGv2.0
It's a shame I will never buy this film due to the terrible ending. Does anybody know if the DVD release has an alternate ending? Even in the extras.

I will never believe that ending passed test audiances.

This makes 3 films where the praise lobbed on by the industry and media, did NOT equal the response of the audeinces I viewed the films with.

Blair Witch Project
The Departed
No Country for Old Men


In all of these the entire audiance was dissapointed and verbally upset. Blair Witch actually had food thrown at the screen.

Warlord
QUOTE(BGv2.0 @ Mar 16 2008, 11:14 PM) [snapback]382902[/snapback]
It's a shame I will never buy this film due to the terrible ending. Does anybody know if the DVD release has an alternate ending? Even in the extras.

I will never believe that ending passed test audiances.

This makes 3 films where the praise lobbed on by the industry and media, did NOT equal the response of the audeinces I viewed the films with.

Blair Witch Project
The Departed
No Country for Old Men
In all of these the entire audiance was dissapointed and verbally upset. Blair Witch actually had food thrown at the screen.

What bothered you about the ending, BG? The blunt, kind of chopped off manner in which it ended; or the fact that there was no real resolution?

I hold a very low opinion of the common man, so the thought and image of a countless number of audience members becoming visibly upset at the ending of this films only heightens my respect for it. laugh.gif

Hollywood is shit, for the most part, and has been for a long time. I'm tired of the same fucking trite-ass routine involved in 99% of films today. If I wanted to watch another dull, by-the-numbers heist flick I could've went to Blockbuster and rented one from the Drama section. God knows there are plenty of them.

I give big props to the Coens and anyone else out there trying to break through the mold. It takes balls, doing something you know that 90% of the people will never understand, and will rail on the filmmaker because they can't.
Bill The Butcher
I was talking to my brother about the ending the other day. And he brought up an interesting point that I didn't really think about. But it seems that a good chunk of time passed from when Brolin's character was killed and Chigurh finally finds the wife. How long? I don't know. Weeks or months? And the wife's mom who died of cancer kind of explains the time that had passed. So does this mean Anton Chigurh was roaming around trying to find the wife the whole time to fulfill his promise? If that is the case, HAHAHA! That's hardcore. Makes me like the ending that much more.
BGv2.0
QUOTE(Warlord @ Mar 17 2008, 12:36 AM) [snapback]382913[/snapback]
What bothered you about the ending, BG? The blunt, kind of chopped off manner in which it ended; or the fact that there was no real resolution?

I hold a very low opinion of the common man, so the thought and image of a countless number of audience members becoming visibly upset at the ending of this films only heightens my respect for it. laugh.gif

Hollywood is shit, for the most part, and has been for a long time. I'm tired of the same fucking trite-ass routine involved in 99% of films today. If I wanted to watch another dull, by-the-numbers heist flick I could've went to Blockbuster and rented one from the Drama section. God knows there are plenty of them.

I give big props to the Coens and anyone else out there trying to break through the mold. It takes balls, doing something you know that 90% of the people will never understand, and will rail on the filmmaker because they can't.

"I hold a very low opinion of the common man, so the thought and image of a countless number of audience members becoming visibly upset at the ending of this films only heightens my respect for it."

This might explain your like for JAWNY!!!!! lol thumbsup_anim.gif


I do not like not having a solid resolution. They could have made me happy simply by filming an alternate and giving the viewer a choice on the DVD which to use. I've spoken with many, many people about this film and it seems the ending is a love it or hate it type subject.

For me, I would have liked to have had closure on the part of the killer. You get that to a point with Tommy Lee Jones's sheriff, you know he has decided to call it a day. I myself would have liked to have seen Chigurh given a DEFINATE fate. I've heard so many theories as to what happened "well I think"....or "it's plain to see he did this"....when it's all speculation.

Which to some might be satisfying.....but not for me, for sure when you hold this film on the same table as other Cohen Bros. Films. Fargo, Big Labowski, Hudsucker Proxy, Blood Simple, Millers Crossing, Barton Fink, Raising Arizona....all of these great films had proper endings. No Contry was 99% on the level with these films....but dropped the ball big with not giving closure. NOW....I understand that this was the way the novel ended. And I do understand the desire to keep your film as close as you can to the book.....but for me....and at least from all the folks that were in the theater with me....it was very dissapointing.

I myself would have ended it like this.

Chigurh gets in the car wreck at the end....but his injuries are much more severe....the child walks up to him and even in a death rattle the guy is attempting to put the air gun nozzle to the kids head, the kid is sitting there for a few seconds as the audiance waits....and he finally falls limp, dropping the air gun...dead. A classic movie villan dies a classic death that fits his personality....even in his final moments, he remains cold and attempting to take life.

Just my version of what would have made the film ending much more satisfying.
Method
QUOTE(Warlord @ Mar 16 2008, 06:01 AM) [snapback]382750[/snapback]
There was so much underlying shit in that movie that I still haven't figured it all out. But that kind of shit appeals to me, so I was satisfied in a masochistic sort of way that the film ended the way it did. Abruptly, and almost like a slap in the face.

Basically it felt like Tommy Lee Jones' character felt over-powered by the world, as if the kind of man he was no longer had a place in the world, hence the name of the title.

As for Anton Chigurh, I never saw him as a villain at all. The way the film set him up, I think he and Tommy Lee's characters were played as 2 sides of the same coin. The way we caught their muddled reflection in the television, the way they occupied the same couch, both drank the milk, etc...

Chigurh's most telling sentence, I think, was when he compared himself to the coin, saying that what brought the coin was what brought him. Chigurh had a set of moral standards that he lived by, and was completely uncompromising. In a strange sort of way, Josh Brolin's character, Llewelyn, almost came off as the real villain of the film, metaphorically speaking. He was the one with the loosest moral conviction. He took what didn't belong to him, and in the process failed to help those closest to him, or even put them in danger. (The dying Mexican, his wife whom he could've saved if only he'd returned the money, her mother, etc...)

To make a long story short, the ending is great for those of us who like to look deeper into such things. And I can also imagine it pissing off a good deal of people who want a more straight-forward ending to their stories.

On a completely unrelated noted, when I first watched the movie I wondered if Chigurh really did kill Llewelyn's wife. But if you look very closely, you can see Chigurh checking his shoes for blood when he walks out of the house. And knowing his strict moral code, I think the answer is pretty clear. Just food for thought.


Warlord, great perspective. I agree with it 110%...especially your comments on Llewelyn Moss.

What I picked up, retrospectively, is that the conversation that Tommy Lee Jones' character has with his Uncle (dad's brother) really is key to the way the movie ends. Not only does Tommy Lee feel tired/outmatched, but even more so than that, when his uncle tells him "Whatcha got ain't nothin new. This country's hard on people, you can't stop what's coming, it ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity.". The words hit home, and instead of seeing the investigation through, Lee accepts that he does not have to solve every crime and simply retires. Fantastic.

I have also read that Chigurh's charachter was more the symbol of death. Death incarnate. Not necessarily a criminal.

Another scene where Chigurh had his feet off the ground to avoid leaving blood prints...when he killed Woddy Harrelson's character.

I'm gonna buy this and I am obviously gonna watch it again.

My old man read the book. Said it was great.
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