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King Eugene
QUOTE
By Mark Vester

According to the Las Vegas Review Journal , the Nevada State Athletic Commission voted unanimously on Wednesday to use instant replay on a limited basis for boxing. Instant replay would be used solely at the discretion of the referee to confirm a call - like whether a clash of heads was intentional or accidental, or how a cut was opened. If the regulation is approved by the Legislative Council Bureau and filed by the state's librarian in thirty days, then instant replay will be used in Floyd Mayweather Jr. vs Juan Manuel Marquez on September 19.

"We'll see how it works," NAC executive director Keith Kizer said. "It's an additional tool for the referee, and that's a good thing."

The paper spoke to several boxing personalities who saw the use of instant replay as a very positive move.

"It's an excellent tool to use if you're in doubt,'' veteran referee Joe Cortez said. ''It's better to get the call right. You want to be fair to the fighters and to the fans. It'll only make boxing better."

"It's a good thing. A lot of times, fights are stopped with a head-butt and you don't know if it was accidental or intentional. The replay will clear up any questions," said Rocky Juarez, who faces Chris John on Mayweather-Marquez.

Send News Tips and Comments To Mark Vester @ boxingvester@gmail.com

Bout dang time!
Jack 1000
QUOTE (King Eugene @ Aug 20 2009, 08:11 PM) *
Bout dang time!


As long as instant replay does not detract from the flow of the fight too much, I would fully support it.

Jack
King Eugene
QUOTE (Jack 1000 @ Aug 20 2009, 09:15 PM) *
As long as instant replay does not detract from the flow of the fight too much, I would fully support it.

Jack

I think it will help out a lot for the cut stoppages.
STEVENSKI
Wonder how it would work for low blows?
Jack 1000
We need to know what issues will be allowed and not allowed for the trial use of Instant Replay:

The proposal in Nevada is that only the ref will make a determination whether or not to use it in a fight. The early indications seem to be that he can call up the TV monitor at the commission's desk to review:

1.) Whether a punch came from a cut or a head-butt.

2.) Whether a body blow was legal or low.

What we DON'T know yet:

1.) Will it also be used on the determination of slips vs. knockdowns in borderline cases?

2.) How would this affect judges who have already marked their cards for that round?

3.) Is the controversial call reviewed at the point in time of the incident or during the rest in-between rounds?

4.) Can the cornermen have the ref review a ruling? How do we control abuses of the system in this case? If the cornermen are going to be involved in the Instant Replay process, to prevent abuses of the system they should get only ONE peremptory challenge per fighter. (This is to make sure that they aren't questioning every ref call.) The challenge should be made between rounds and the ref must make a decision during the rest period. The challenge is either accepted (overturned ruling) or the ref's call remains.

For Nevada, as it is for the trial run, it is totally up to the ref to determine whether or not he will use instant replay.

The WBC is experimenting with a slightly modified system of instant replay in commissions that allow it. (Very few have so far.) If the ref questions how he saw a fighter get cut (punch or head-butt.) He can go to a three panel review board that controls the video equipment. (Not the official judges as I understand it.) The three person panel must be in UNANIMOUS consent that the ref made a bad ruling and if all three agree the ruling was wrong, the ref's decision is overturned. I am not sure if it's the ref that can request the panel review or the cornermen. (or both.) Not sure how many challenges they get. Japan is using it as an optional rule along with the dreaded optional open scoring in WBC title fights.

Does anyone know how Instant Replay works in New Jersey? Has it been well received there?

This is all new so I am not positive on some of the stuff above. It's just what I have read concerning the few jurisdictions that have it.

Jack
Jack 1000
QUOTE (King Eugene @ Aug 20 2009, 08:42 PM) *
I think it will help out a lot for the cut stoppages.


If it's used for this and this alone I think it's great! I talk about some other issues in my previous post in this thread that we will have to study. It is interesting!

Jack
AussieLad
The implementation of this rule should be simple and not effect the fight at all

If you let the ref make the call on a knockdown, low blow, etc.. as normal during a fight, and the video is reviewed in between rounds by a panel either confirming or overturning the refs call, that would be the perfect scenario
torvix2000
Instant replay in boxing is a feature for the referee to use.
Spyder
QUOTE (AussieLad @ Aug 21 2009, 04:11 AM) *
The implementation of this rule should be simple and not effect the fight at all

If you let the ref make the call on a knockdown, low blow, etc.. as normal during a fight, and the video is reviewed in between rounds by a panel either confirming or overturning the refs call, that would be the perfect scenario

I totally agree.

I can only imagine 2 minute breaks between rounds and fighter's getting more time to recover when knocked down to confirm it. I hope they employ a seperate replay judge to spot inconsistencies, and allow the ref to just do his job as normal.
rusty_trombone
yeah, I think a lot of the calls in boxing are still way too subjective for replay to be effective. You can't really see intent on a replay, you can just see actions. Replay should be used for figuring out facts, like was a cut from a punch or head butt, not "was the head butt intentional?". Things that are clear, like clocking issues, and maybe low blows, slips and knockdowns are another possibility.

torvix2000
QUOTE (rusty_trombone @ Aug 21 2009, 10:44 PM) *
yeah, I think a lot of the calls in boxing are still way too subjective for replay to be effective. You can't really see intent on a replay, you can just see actions. Replay should be used for figuring out facts, like was a cut from a punch or head butt, not "was the head butt intentional?". Things that are clear, like clocking issues, and maybe low blows, slips and knockdowns are another possibility.

There will be instant replay for Cotto-Pacquiao, too. It will only be for the ref. Just in case a butt isn't clear as to whether it's accidental or not and the ref didn't use the instant replay feature, then there is one who can be CLEARLY BLAMED for it in case his decision is erroneous.
rusty_trombone
QUOTE (torvix2000 @ Aug 21 2009, 08:21 PM) *
It will only be for the ref. Just in case a butt isn't clear as to whether it's accidental or not and the ref didn't use the instant replay feature, then there is one who can be CLEARLY BLAMED for it in case his decision is erroneous.

Can someone translate this?
torvix2000
LOL!

QUOTE (torvix2000 @ Aug 22 2009, 12:21 AM) *
There will be instant replay for Cotto-Pacquiao, too. It will only be for the ref. Just in case a butt isn't clear as to whether it's accidental or not and the ref didn't use the instant replay feature, then there is one who can be CLEARLY BLAMED for it in case the ref made a bad call - THE REF.

Jack 1000
Here is the news from Nevada on Instant Replay.

The Nevada State Boxing Commission has approved Instant Replay for both boxing and MMA contests by a unanimous 5-0 vote. It still must be formally approved by the State Legislature, and if so will be on the books either for Mayweather-Marquez or shortly thereafter. It depends on when paperwork is filed:

It will be an optional rule at the discretion of the referee for the fight. It will ONLY be used during stoppages in fights if the ref is unsure about whether cuts come from punches or headbutts. Calls on knockdowns, slips, low blows, will NOT apply under Instant Replay at this point in time.

In other news, Nevada overturned a former rule that prohibits boxers from applying for a license in the state because of a brain hemorrhage. Boxing such as Edwin Velero will now be allowed to apply for a license in Nevada. THIS DOES NOT MEAN THEY WILL BE ALLOWED TO BOX FOR SURE, IT JUST MEANS THAT BOXERS CAN APPLY FOR A LICENSE IF THEY HAVE HAD A BRAIN INJURY IN THE PAST. Medical testing and clearance checks will still be enforced as always. More from ESPN notes from the commission director here:

http://sports.espn.go.com/sports/boxing/ne...tory?id=4412138

Jack
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