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Full Version: Vasquez stops Priolo in 9
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kidbazooka1
Vasquez stopped Priolo in the 9th rd of a tough competitve fight Vasquez showed some rust but managed to put Priolo down three times in the 9th for the win.

I wouldn't mind seeing a 4th fight with Marquez which we all know will be another FOTY candidate but I would actually prefer to see him in with a Lopez or Caballero instead.

How about a mini tourney.

Marquez vs Caballero

Lopez vs vasquez

with the winners and losers facing each other.
KYLE THEEE SPINKS FAN
Yea, two of the judges had it even actually. I don't know how much Vazquez has left after those wars with Marquez. I wouldn't be shocked if he's washed up right now. Honestly, I think the best fight for him is a 4th fight with Marquez because Marquez may be in as bad a shape as Vazquez is right now. I still think Lopez absolutely destroys Vazquez at this point. I hope I'm wrong because I love watching Vazquez fight, but dude has been in a lot of wars.
kidbazooka1
QUOTE (KYLE THEEE SPINKS FAN @ Oct 11 2009, 12:10 AM) *
Yea, two of the judges had it even actually. I don't know how much Vazquez has left after those wars with Marquez. I wouldn't be shocked if he's washed up right now. Honestly, I think the best fight for him is a 4th fight with Marquez because Marquez may be in as bad a shape as Vazquez is right now. I still think Lopez absolutely destroys Vazquez at this point. I hope I'm wrong because I love watching Vazquez fight, but dude has been in a lot of wars.


I agree i think both Vasquez and Marquez are not the same fighters but I would never count those two out.

I could see Lopez blowing away Vasquez but I think Marquez style wise will give Lopez some trouble.
lovers321a
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  The most significant finding was the discovery of “mirror neurons,” a widely dispersed class of brain cells that operate like neural WiFi. Mirror neurons track the emotional flow, movement and even intentions of the person we are with, and replicate this sensed state in our own brain by stirring in our brain the same areas active in the other person.
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  Mirror neurons offer a neural mechanism that explains emotional contagion, the tendency of one person to catch the feelings of another, particularly if strongly expressed. This brain-to-brain link may also account for feelings of rapport, which research finds depend in part on extremely rapid synchronization of people’s posture, vocal pacing and movements as they interact. In short, these brain cells seem to allow the interpersonal orchestration of shifts in physiology.
  
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  John T. Cacioppo, director of the Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience at the University of Chicago, makes a parallel proposal: the emotional status of our main relationships has a significant impact on our overall pattern of cardiovascular and neuroendocrine activity. This radically expands the scope of biology and neuroscience from focusing on a single body or brain to looking at the interplay between two at a time. In short, my hostility bumps up your blood pressure, your nurturing love lowers mine. Potentially, we are each other’s biological enemies or allies.
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  Even remotely suggesting health benefits from these interconnections will, no doubt, raise hackles in medical circles. No one can claim solid data showing a medically significant effect from the intermingling of physiologies.
 
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  My friend has reached that point where doctors see nothing else to try. On my last visit, he and his wife told me that he was starting hospice care.
  
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